Free Your Mind

Nearly a quarter of all drivers involved in fatal crashes, more in fender-benders, had been upset by an incident or a quarrel during the six hours leading up to the incident.

Free Your Mind

The human brain continues to outperform supercomputers in a range of complex tasks from instant facial recognition to dissecting complex patterns.

It can multi-task physical operations while prioritising safe and threatening scenarios, form a plan based on that information and act. All while consuming less energy than a light bulb.

We take this miracle and pack it so full of rubbish that it fails the task of driving. The main drain on the mental system is human emotion. I’m not talking about people who cry when their cat sneezes; it goes deeper than that. There are key emotional triggers that interfere with the cognitive process and they need to be eliminated.

Nearly a quarter of all drivers involved in fatal crashes, more in fender-benders, had been upset by an incident or a quarrel during the six hours leading up to the incident.

Stress and the emotional baggage it brings with it come in many guises and it’s sometimes hard to see it coming. Anything that makes you twitch or feel negative will affect your decision-making process.

The perception of being ‘out of time’ can turn you into a time bomb. Enslaved to the clock, you become totally uncompromising, shutting down your willingness to adapt to the road conditions or anyone sharing them.

The solution? I wish I had one. We are always in a hurry these days; just try to suck it up and smile. Stay cool because you’ll live longer.

Stress is a killer, the sense of being overwhelmed by circumstances that you are powerless to overcome. Apparently, long-distance commuting exerts so much stress it’s a miracle we survive the journey. One study concluded that a third of commuters travelling three hours daily in Germany were ‘from a medical point of view, clearly in need of treatment’. Their condition was cited as ‘terrible’ and included a blend of dizziness, sleep deprivation and bodily pains.

Other studies show that driving stress raises blood pressure and increases the likelihood of heart disease. The only consolation is that users of public transport are more likely to contract infectious diseases.